AAPOR Poster Presentation: Introduction Breakoffs, Questionnaire Breakoffs and Web Questionnaire Length

24.05.16

Gregor Čehovin from the Centre for Social Informatics attended the American Association for Public Opinion Research’s (AAPOR) 71st Annual Conference. At the conference’s first poster session, he presented the preliminary results of an ongoing metastudy of survey breakoffs entitled “Introduction breakoffs, questionnaire breakoffs and web questionnaire length: a metastudy”.

The study is being conducted together with Dr Vasja Vehovar and aims to show that different factors contribute to different types of breakoffs by analysing a sample of approximately 6,000 web questionnaires. The objective is to separately define and analyse 1) breakoffs that occur during the survey introduction; and 2) breakoffs that happen later during the questionnaire. This is different from the prevailing reporting only of all types of breakoffs together, which holds little practical value because separate reporting offers a more powerful insight into breakoff prevention.

The AAPOR 71st Annual Conference took place in Austin, Texas, USA from 12 to 15 May 2016. The central theme this year was "Reshaping the Research Landscape: Public Opinion and Data Science". Traditionally, this conference addresses data science and survey methodology in various contexts that are highly relevant to the Centre’s research operations. In 2009, AAPOR granted the Warren J. Mitofsky Innovators Award to Vasja Vehovar and Katja Lozar Manfreda for the WebSM website (http://websm.org) that is a central online resource for survey methodology. Notable contributions of the Centre for Social Informatics to the field of survey methodology also include the open source data collection tool 1KA (https://english.1ka.si) and the book “Web Survey Methodology” (2015, SAGE) by Mario Callegaro (Google, Inc.), Katja Lozar Manfreda and Vasja Vehovar.

>> AAPOR 71st Annual Conference - Programme

>> AAPOR 71st Annual Conference - Abstracts

 

 

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